Smart Marketing Blog

5 Ways to Promote Your Brand Message

This is part 3 of a blog series on brand positioning and messaging. Learn more by reading part 1 on developing your brand position and part 2 on brand messaging. Once you have developed your brand position and used the positioning language to develop your brand messaging, you should be ready to use your messaging. But how should you start?

How to Create a B2B Marketing Plan that Drives Results

Updated August 15, 2017 There is a great saying many marketers use, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there.” Without a plan, how do you know what you need to do, in priority order, to get there? In busy times, it is difficult to take a pause from everyday work to stop, breathe, focus, and plan. Instead, many rush down any road that looks promising at the moment. Unfortunately, these unplanned roads lead to mediocre results and higher costs – in time, money, stress, and frustration.

Part 2: 4 Steps to Develop Your Brand Message

This is part 2 of a blog series on brand positioning and messaging. In the first post, I explain the 10 steps to develop your brand positioning. In this next post, I explain how to use the positioning language to develop your brand messaging. It is recommended you read part 1 of this series before reading this post.

TREW Marketing and Elektor Partner Together

TREW Marketing and Elektor have partnered together this year to conduct research on engineers and scientists in Europe in industries including aerospace/defense, consumer electronics, and automative. Research was also conducted on the differences between engineers in the U.S. vs. Europe. 

Part 1: 10 Steps to Develop Your Brand Position

This is part 1 of a 2-part series on brand positioning and messaging. In this first post, I’ll walk step by step through the process of developing your brand positioning. In the next post, I’ll then talk about using the positioning language to develop your brand messaging.

What’s All This Marketing Stuff, Anyhow?

Gaining the trust of an engineering audience is no easy task. They easily smell the difference between material generated by marketing compared to that produced by your tech team. But if you’ve spent hours and dollars carefully honing your brand and image, it is difficult to let that go just to appease a technical audience.

Seven Characteristics of a Great Spokesperson

This post originally ran in 2014 and has been updated. This week, TREW Marketing is on the road, conducting a press tour with a client who recently introduced a new product. As we prepped, we were reminded of the factors behind a successful technical press meeting, and one of the most important: a great spokesperson. During a press meeting, your technical spokesperson becomes the voice of your company as he or she shares with the press a story and message that will be written and later read by your target audience. While often the person is an expert on the product or technology, they are less often comfortable or experienced telling that story to an external media audience. However, the strength of your spokesperson makes a significant difference in how your company is covered by the press, and in some instances, whether it’s covered at all. So, if you, or someone you know, may be called on to serve as a technical spokesperson for your company, here are seven traits that can transform a technical expert into a great spokesperson.

Brand Positioning: Questions to Ask

Simply put, brand positioning is the process of getting your target audience to know your brand and associate it with specific characteristics and attributes. One of the first steps to brand positioning is to create a company positioning statement that describes what you do, who you do it for, and what differentiates you from others in the market.

Book Review: Get a Grip

I love reading business books. I’ve always loved to learn, and after college, reading books has been a valuable source of ongoing learning. From time to time, a book will really strike me as especially valuable – maybe because the topic is especially interesting to me, like my review of Simon Sinek’s book, Leaders Eat Last or the timing is right for me to learn about a subject. Or maybe it’s the author’s ability to present a topic in a simple and meaningful way that resonates. 

Creating a Killer Corporate Pitch Deck

Once your message is set, you’ll need content to share and deliver the story of your company. A great way to do this is to have a well-designed corporate slide deck. A corporate slide deck can be disseminated through your company so that multiple teams can give presentations that have the same look, feel, and message. I recommend writing a script for the slides and including it in the notes of the slide. Presenters don’t need to use the script verbatim, but an available script allows a presenter to understand the main point for each slide and get a feel for the key related messages. They can then use whatever words and personal stories they need to articulate the corporate message with their own voice.